Resources

Products

The Three R’s of Early Childhood: Relationships, Resilience and Readiness, a DVD promoting school readiness and social emotional development

Stories from our Hearts: A DVD series of family stories designed to reduce stigma around early childhood mental health issues

A series of reflective practice DVDs Translation of early childhood products such as My Feeling Activity Book for Project ABC Los Angeles into Chinese and Korean


More Resources

Child Development/Wellness | Child Welfare | Cultural | Mental Health | Policy | Reflective Practice | Special Needs/Developmental Disabilities | Trauma/Violence

Reflective Practices

Amini Virmani, E. & Ontai, L. (2010). Does Reflective Supervision Foster Caregiver Insightfulness? Infant Mental Health Journal, 31(1), 16-32.

Bernstein, V. (2004). Standing firm against the forces of risk: Supporting Home Visiting and Early Intervention Workers through Reflective Supervision. IDA News, 31(2), 1, 13-19.

Bernstein V., Campbell, S., & Ajers, A. (2001). Caring for the caregivers: Supporting the well-being of at-risk parents and children through supporting the well-being of the programs that serve them. In J. Hughes, J. Close, & A. La Greca (Eds.), Handbook of psychological services for children and adolescents (pp.107-13). New York: Oxford University Press.

Bertacchi, J. (1996). Relationship-based Organizations. Zero To Three/National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, 17(2), 1-7.

Bertacci, J. & Coplon, J. (1992). The professional use of self in prevention. In E. Fenichel (Ed.), Learning Through Supervision and Mentorship to Support the Development of Infants, Toddlers and their Families: A Source Book. Washington, DC: Zero to Three.

Bertacchi, J., & Gilkerson, L. (2009). How can Administrative and Reflective Supervision be Combined? In S. Scott Heller & L. Gilkerson (Eds.), A practical guide to reflective supervision (pp.121-134). Washington DC: Zero To Three.

Bertacchi, J, & Norman-Murch, T. (1999). Implementing Reflective Supervision in Non-Clinical Settings: Challenges to Practice. Zero To Three/National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 20(1), 18-23.

Bulman, C. & Schutz, S. ( Eds.) (2008). Reflective Practice in Nursing, 4th Edition. New York: Wiley-Blackwell.

Copa, A., Lucinski, L., Olsen, E., & Wollenburg, K. (1999). Promoting Professional and Organizational Development: A Reflective Practice Model. Zero To Three/National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. 20(1), 3-9.

Cox, E. (2005). Adult learners learning from experience: Using a reflective practice model to support work-based learning. Reflective Practice, 6, 459-472.

Doan-Sampon, M. A., Wollenburg, K., Campbell A., & Portage Project Staff. (1993). Growing: Birth to Three. Portage, WI: Portage Project.

Edelman, L. (2004). A relationship-based approach to early intervention (pdf). Retrieved on May 12, 2009 from http://olms.cte.jhu.edu/olms/data/resource/

Emde, R. N. (2009). Facilitating reflective supervision in an early child development center. Infant Mental Health Journal, 30(6), 664-673.

Eggbeer, L., Mann, T. L., & Seibel, N. (2007). Reflective Supervision: Past, present & future. In Zero to Three. Special Issue: Reflective Supervision: What is it and why do it? 28(2), (pp. 5-10).

Fenichel, E.(Ed.). (1992). Learning through supervision and mentorship to support the development of infants, toddlers, and their families: A source book. Washington, DC: Zero to Three/NCCIP.

Foulds, B. & Curtiss, K. (2002). No Longer Risking Myself: Assisting the Supervisor Through Supportive Consultation. In J. Shirilla & D. Weatherston (Eds.), Case Studies in Infant Mental Health: Risk, Resiliency, and Relationships (pp. 177-186). Washington, DC: Zero to Three.

Geller, E. & Foley, G.M. (2008). Broadening the “Ports of Entry” for Speech-Language Pathologist: A relational and reflective model for clinical supervision. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 18, 22-41.

Germer, C.K. (2005). Mindfulness: What is it? What does it matter? In C.K. Germer, R.O. Siegel, & P. R. Fulton (Eds.), Mindfulness and Psychotherapy. New York: Guilford Press.

Gilkerson, L. (2004). Reflective supervision in infant-family programs: Adding clinical process to nonclinical settings. Infant Mental Health Journal, 25(5), 424-439.

Gilkerson, L. & Shahmoon-Shanok, R. (2000). Relationships for growth: Cultivating reflective practice in infant, toddler and preschool programs. In J. Osofsky & H. Fitzgerald (Eds). WAIMH Handbook of infant mental health. Vol. 2. Early intervention, evaluation and assessment. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Gilkerson, L. & Ritzler, T.T. (2005). The role of reflective process in infusing relationship-based practice into an early intervention system. In K. M. Finello (Ed). Handbook of training and practice in infant and preschool mental health (pp. 427-452). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Harden, B. (2009) Beyond Reflective Supervision: How can my Organization Support Well-being. In S. Scott Heller & L. Gilkerson (Eds). A practical guide to reflective supervision (135-148). Washington DC: Zero to Three.

Hawkins, P. & Shohet, R. (2007). Supervision in the helping professions. Third edition. Maidenhead, Berkshire, England: Open University Press. McGraw Hill Education.

Healthy Families America Self Assessment Tool. ( 2008). Retrieved March 2, 2010 from www.healthyfamiliesamerica.org/downloads/self_assessment. (pdf)

Heffron, M. C. (1999). Balance in Jeopardy: Reflexive Reactions vs. Reflective Responses in Infant/Family Practice. Zero To Three/National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. 20(1), 15-17.

Heffron, M.C. (2004). Learning to be a reflective supervisor: Techniques and approaches. IDA News, 31(2), 4-5.

Heffron, M.C. (2005). Reflective Supervision in Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Work. In Finello, K. M. (Ed.), Handbook of Training and Practice in Infant and Preschool Mental Health (pp. 114-136). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Heffron, M.C., Grunstein, S. & Tilmon, S. Exploring Diversity in Supervision and Practice. Zero to Three, Vol. 28, 34-39.

Heffron, M.C., Ivins, B., & Weston, D.R. (2005) Finding an authentic voice. Use of Self: Essential Learning Processes for relationship based work. Infants and Young Children. 18(4), 323-336.

Heffron, M.C. & Murch, T. (2010). Reflective supervision and leadership in infant and early childhood programsWashington, DC: Zero To Three.

Heller, S.S., Jozefowica, F., Reams, R., & Weinstock, J. (2004). Starting where the program is: Three infant mental health consultants discuss reflective practice. Zero to Three, 24(6), 10-20.

Howes, C., James, J. & Ritchie, S. (2003). Pathways to effective teaching. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 18, 104-120. Infant Mental Health Journal. (2009). Special Issue. Working within the context of relationships: Multidisciplinary, relational and reflective practice, training and supervision. 30(6).

Johns, C. (2008). Becoming a Reflective Practitioner. Second Edition. Oxford, England: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Kabat-Zinn, J. (2003) Mindfulness-based interventions in context: Past, present and future. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 10(2), 144-156.

Keyes, A.W., Cavanaugh, A.E., & Scott Heller, S. (2009). How do I, as a reflective supervisor, repair ruptures in the supervisory relationship? In S. Scott Heller & L. Gilkerson (Eds.). A practical guide to reflective supervision (pp. 99-119). Washington DC: Zero To Three.

Larrieu, J. A. & Dickson, A. B. (2009). Reflective practice in infant mental health training and consultation. Infant Mental Health Journal, 30(6), 579-591.

Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health (2007). Best Practice Guidelines for Reflective Supervision Consultation. Retrieved April 17, 2010 from www.mi-aimh.org (pdf)

Norman-Murch, T. (1996). Reflective Supervision as a Vehicle for Individual and Organizational Development. Zero To Three/National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, 17(2), 16-20.

Norman-Murch, T. (1999). Reflective Practice in Relationship-Based Organizations. Special Edition of Zero to Three, 20(1).

Norman-Murch, T. & Ward, G. (1999) First Steps in Establishing Reflective Practice and Supervision: Organizational Issues and Strategies. Zero To Three/National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. 20(1), 10-14.

Norman-Murch, T. (2005). Keeping our Balance on a Slippery Slope: Training and supporting infant/family specialists within an organizational context. Infants and Young Children. 18(4) 308-322.

Parlakian, R. (2002). Reflective supervision in practice: Stories from the field. Washington, DC, Zero to Three.

Parlakian, R. (2001). Look, Listen and Learn: Reflective supervision and relationship-based work. Washington, DC: Zero to Three.

Parlakian, R. & Seibel, N. (2001). Being in Charge: Reflective Leadership in Infant – Family Programs. Washington, DC: Zero to Three.

Pawl, J. H. (1995). On supervision. In R. Shanok, L. Gilkerson, L. Eggbeer, & E. Fenichel (Eds.) Reflective supervision: A relationship for learning. Discussion guide (pp. 41-49). Arlington, VA: Zero to Three.

Pawl, J. & St. John, M. (1998). How you are is as important as what you do. In Making a Positive Difference for Infants, Toddlers and their Families. Washington, D.C.: Zero to Three.

Pflieger, J. (2002). Reflective Supervision. Child Mental Health. Head Start Bulletin #73. HHS/ACF/ACYF/HSB.

Samuels, M. & Betts, J. (2007). Crossing the threshold from description to deconstruction and reconstruction: using self-assessment to deepen reflection. Reflective Practice, Vol. 8, 269-283.

Schafer, W. (2007). Models & domains of supervision and their relationship to professional development . Zero to Three, 28(2), 10-17.

Schon, D. (1987). Educating the Reflective Practitioner. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass.

Schon, D. (1983). The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action. London: Temple Smith.

Senge, P., Scharmer, C.O., Jaworski, J., & Flowers, B.S. (2005). Presence: An exploration of profound change in people, organizations & society. New York: Doubleday.

Siegel, D.J. (2007). The Mindful Brain. Reflection and attunement in the cultivation of well-being. New York: W. W. Norton.

Shahmoon-Shanok, R. (2006). Reflective Supervision for an Integrated Model: What, why and how? In G. Foley & J. Hochman (Eds.) Mental Health in Early Intervention: A unity of principles and practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Shahmoon-Shanok, R. (1992). The supervisory relationship: Integrator, resource, and guide. In E. Fenichel (Ed.), Learning through supervision and mentorship to support the development of infants, toddlers, and their families: A sourcebook. (pp. 37-41). Washington, DC: Zero to Three.

Shahmoon-Shanok & Geller, E. (2009). Embracing complexity across disciplines: Reflective supervision and post degree training integrate mental health concepts with speech-language therapy and graduate education. Infant Mental Health Journal, 30 (6), 591-621.

Shahmoon Shanok, R., Gilkerson, L., Eggbeer, L. & Fenichel, E. (1995). Reflective Supervision: A Relationship for Learning. A training videotape, discussion guide and sourcebook. Washington, DC: Zero to Three.

Stern, D. N. (2004). The present moment in psychotherapy and everyday life. New York: W.W. Norton.

Tomlin, A.M., Sturm, L., & Koch, S.M. (2009). Observe, listen, wonder and respond: A preliminary exploration of reflective function skills in early care providers. Infant Mental Health Journal, 30(6), 634-648.

Warren, B. & Mares, S. (2009). Developing reflective skills in infant mental health postgraduate students: The Australian experience. Infant Mental Health Journal, 30(6), 621-634.

Weatherston, D. (2007). A home-based infant mental health intervention: The centrality of relationships in reflective supervision. In Zero to Three. Special Issue: Reflective Supervision: What is it and why do it? 28(2).

Weatherston, D.J. & Osofsky, J.D. (2009). Working within the context of relationships: Multidisciplinary, relational and reflective practice, training and supervision. Infant Mental Health Journal, 30(6), 573-579.

Weigand, R. F. (2007). Reflective Supervision in Child Care: The discoveries of an accidental tourist. Zero to Three. 28(2), 17-23.

Weston, D., Ivins, B., Heffron, M. & Sweet, N. (1997). Formulating the centrality of relationships in early intervention: An organizational perspective. Infants and Young Children, (9)3, 1-12.

Weston, D.R. (2005).Training in infant mental health: Educating the reflective practitioner. Infants & Young Children, (pdf) 18(4), 337- 348. http://depts.washington.edu/isei/iyc/weston_18.4_05.pdf

Wajda, Johnston, V., Smke, A., & Nagle, G, (2005). Using technology as a training, supervision and consultation aid. In K.M. Finello (Ed.), The handbook of training and practice in infant and preschool mental health (pp. 357-374). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Wightman, B., Whitaker, K., Traylor, D., Yeider, S., Hyden, V.C., & Weigand, B. (2007). In Zero to Three. Special Issue: Reflective Supervision: What is it and why do it? 28(2), 29-34.

Zero to Three (2007). Special Issue. Reflective Supervision: What is it and why do it? (28)2.